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CounterSpin

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CounterSpin, FAIR’s weekly radio show, provides a critical examination of the major stories every week, and exposes what the mainstream media might have missed in their own coverage.
Updated: 11 weeks 2 days ago

Laurie Garrett on Ebola Crisis, Anne Petermann on Climate March

Fri, 2014-09-26 06:54
This week on CounterSpin: The current outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa is unprecedented in its scale. But while some media focus on experimental vaccines, health experts say we ought to be talking about fundamental inequities in basic healthcare delivery. We'll talk about ebola with Laurie Garrett, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations. Also on the show: The largest environmental march ever brought hundreds of thousands into New York City streets, but the People's Climate Watch was mostly ignored by the media. As was its companion action, Flood Wall Street, which targeted corporations behind climate instability with civil disobedience. Is the people's voice on climate change being ignored by the corporate media just as it's been ignored by corporate backed governments? We'll speak with Anne Petermann, director of the Global Justice Ecology Project, and the Climate-Connections blog.

Raed Jarrar on Iraq & ISIS, Robert Weissman on Democracy for All

Fri, 2014-09-19 08:29
This week on CounterSpin: "We have no choice," CBS's Bob Schieffer told viewers, calling for US military attacks on the extremist group ISIS, because "this evil must be eradicated." Though the shouts of warmongers may make them hard to hear, we do have choices – choices more likely to lead to longterm peace in Iraq and Syria than dropping bombs. We'll hear from Raed Jarrar, policy impact coordinator for the American Friends Service Committee. Also on the show: In response to the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision, there's a grassroots movement to amend the Constitution to try to curtail the influence of big money in politics. But it's not getting much sympathy from the press-- the AP says it's an election year stunt, and pundits like George Will call it an attack on free speech. Robert Weissman of Public Citizen will join us to talk about the Democracy for All amendment.

Antonia Juhasz on BP Spill, Greg Grandin on the Economist and Slavery

Fri, 2014-09-12 08:37
This week on CounterSpin: A judge has ruled BP was guilty of willful misconduct and gross negligence in the Deepwater Horizon disaster that killed 11 people and dumped millions of gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. With Obama talking about expanding offshore drilling, you'd hope the media would take serious notice. We'll talk about what that would look like with Antonia Juhasz, author of Black Tide: the Devastating Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill. Also on the show: The Economist magazine recently apologized and retracted its review of 'The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism,' a review that faulted the author for portraying whites as slavery's villains, and blacks as its victims. Yes. New York University history professor Greg Grandin will join us to talk about the Economist's slavery problem.

David Kotz on Ukraine, Anya Schiffrin on 'Global Muckraking'

Fri, 2014-09-05 07:28
This week on CounterSpin: As the fighting continues in eastern Ukraine, Russian president Putin has proposed a peace plan, and NATO is meeting to discuss Ukraine among other things. What are the prospects for peace and how is the press doing in helping us understand the events in Ukraine. We'll talk with University of Massachusettes professor David Kotz. Also this week: Is this a golden age for investigative journalism? Anya Schiffrin has edited a new collection of global muckracking, and she seems some good news for journalism. She'll join us to explai

Brian Jones on Teacher Tenure, Nikole Hannah-Jones on School Segregation

Fri, 2014-08-29 08:06
This week on CounterSpin: A special back to school episode, with two interviews from this year that get at some of the thorniest issues around public education: The politics of teacher tenure and the de facto segregation of American schools. Our guests are writer and activist Brian Jones and Nikole Hannah-Jones of ProPublica.

Malkia Cyril on Ferguson, Jeff Cohen on James Risen

Fri, 2014-08-22 08:09
This week on CounterSpin: The New York Times' David Carr says 'nothing much good was happening in Ferguson until it became a hashtag'. It's naïve to think that media attention to the police killing of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown is enough to address the crisis it represents, but Carr's not wrong that it was the internet and not corporate media that put the story on the front burner. We'll talk about Ferguson and media with Malkia Cyril of the Center for Media Justice. Also on the show: Will New York Times reporter James Risen go to jail for refusing to testify against a source? Risen's case is seen by many as a clear-cut example of how the Obama administration's war on whistleblowers is also a war on journalists and journalism. We'll talk to FAIR founder Jeff Cohen, director of the Park Center for Independent Media about the state of the case and the activist pushback.

Vijay Prashad on IS and Iraq, Emira Woods on Africa Summit

Fri, 2014-08-15 08:18
This week on CounterSpin: With the Islamic State, or IS, occupying large swathes of Iraq and Syria, a common refrain from politicians and pundits is to suggest that the group would not be a menace had the US intervened earlier and more deeply in the Syrian civil war. Author and professor Vijay Prashad will join us to address that canard and other misconceptions about Iraq, the US and the Islamic State. Also on the show: The recent summit of African leaders in Washington DC was criticized by some for soft-pedaling human rights issues, but that only meant in African nations; media seemed to have no question at all about the beneficent goals of the policy of increased 'investment' on the continent by US corporations. We have some questions; we'll ask them of Emira Woods of ThoughtWorks and the Institute for Policy Studies.

Stephen Pimpare on Paul Ryan, Alyssa Hadley Dunn on Campbell Brown

Fri, 2014-08-08 08:09
Republican Congressman Paul Ryan is back with yet one more plan to fight poverty. And, as usual the national media are giving him plenty of attention. But is there anything new here? And what are the broad lessons—and problems—with the poverty discussions that Ryan inspires? We'll ask poverty researcher and author Stephen Pimpare. Also this week: Former CNN anchor Campbell Brown is making the media rounds with a new corporate education reform group that targets teachers as the problem with public schools. But like other such reformers, Brown has no background in education, and often gets her facts wrong. Michigan State University education professor Alyssa Hadley Dunn with join us with a fact-check.

Arjun Makhijani on Renewable Energy

Fri, 2014-08-01 05:00
The UN's panel of climate scientists have issued grave warnings about continued dependence on fossil fuels, but US policy seems to be looking more to the polluting energy source--with a fracking boom, the Keystone pipeline and, in the latest news, the White House's opening of the Atlantic coast to oil and gas drilling. We'll talk to Arjun Makhijani of the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research about why none of this has to be this way.

Alex Kane on US Weapons in Gaza; Jamie Kalven on Police Abuse Records

Fri, 2014-07-25 10:57
The US press doesn't talk much about where Israel gets its weapons--or other aspects of the US role in the Gaza conflict. And a recent legal victory in Chicago could help expose police brutality in poor communities of color.

David Alexander Bullock on Detroit Water, Ralph Nader on Export-Import Bank

Fri, 2014-07-18 08:10
The UN says water is a human right, and if people are unable to pay, shutting off their water is a human rights violation. That puts the city of Detroit on the wrong side of international law, as well as human decency, with shut-offs affecting thousands of city residents. But the water shut-offs are only the latest attack on the poor and public resources in Detroit. We'll hear from area activist, Pastor David Alexander Bullock. Also this week: Something called the Export-Import Bank started getting some press once Tea Party activists and Republican lawmakers started criticizing it as corporate welfare. Pundits say the critics don't know what they're talking about and could threaten American jobs. But our guest, consumer advocate Ralph Nader, thinks the bank deserves some scrutiny—and that it's an issue that resonates beyond the Tea Party right.

Yousef Munayyer on Gaza Attacks, Lee Fang on Marijuana Legalization

Fri, 2014-07-11 08:26
Israeli airstrikes on Gaza have claimed dozens of Palestinian lives, including those of more than a dozen children. There are no Israeli casualties so far. The fact that US corporate media fail to note the unequal power and disproportionate suffering of Palestinians is just one of the ways middle east coverage is distorted. We'll talk with Yousef Munayyer of the Jerusalem Fund, about that. Also on the show: For the first time, Gallup reports a majority of Americans support the legalization of marijuana. Of course many things can stand between popular opinion and legislation, and in this case one of those things is a powerful industry, though you don't hear much about it in debates around pot. Lee Fang of the Nation institute will join us to talk about his piece, The Real Reason Pot Is Still Illegal.

Dave Zirin on World Cup, Sarah Jaffe on Supreme Court

Fri, 2014-07-04 07:10
Much of the world is tuned into the World Cup. And while the drama on the field is on our TV screens, what about the wrenching political and economic upheaval in host country Brazil that has inspired millions to protest? That's the World Cup story Dave Zirin has been reporting, he'll join us to talk about it. Also this week: The Supreme Court rulings in Hobby Lobby and Harris, though reportedly narrow, may have far-reaching impacts. Particularly as both almost exclusively affect working women. We'll talk with Sarah Jaffe of In These Times.

Murtaza Hussain on Iraq, Laura Carlsen on Immigration Crisis

Fri, 2014-06-27 08:30
This week on CounterSpin: The crisis in Iraq has pundits talking about Al Qaeda and ISIS and regional powers like Iran -- but there's also the suggestion that this is merely the latest round in a 1400 year old war between Muslim sects. That lets the US off the hook, but does it fit with actual history? Writer Murtaza Hussain joins us to explain how it doesn't. Also this week: Are the increasing numbers of children migrants from Central America "refugees who need asylum or illegal gold-diggers who need to go home?" Not clear whom the Christian Science Monitor thought it was helping with such inhumane framing of what the White House is now calling an 'urgent humanitarian situation'. We'll talk about the more complicated pushes and pulls behind this child migration with Laura Carlsen of the Americas Program of the Center for International Policy.

Ross Caputi on Iraq, Brian Jones on Teacher Tenure

Fri, 2014-06-20 08:15
This week on CounterSpin: According to US media, a brutal jihadi group known as ISIS has taken over large regions of Iraq in recent days. This has resulted in a parade of pundits discussing just how massive the US military response should be. We'll talk with Ross Caputi, a former marine who served in Iraq and is a now a leader in the reparations movement, about what is really going on there. Also this week: A judge in California takes aim at tenure for public school teachers, to the delight of education 'reformers' and editorial pages. But are they right about what tenure means? And does any of this help students? We'll talk to writer and activist Brian Jones.

Jennifer Fiore on Gun Violence, Keane Bhatt on Human Rights Watch

Fri, 2014-06-13 08:54
This week on CounterSpin: Another fatal school shooting, another round of media stories about what we as a society need to talk more or more honestly about. One effort now gaining ground says there are some things we can do besides talk. Jennifer Fiore is executive director of the Campaign to Unload. She'll join us to talk about divesting from gun violence. Also on the show: Two Nobel prize laureates have joined scores of academics in publishing letters to Human Rights Watch, challenging the prominent human rights group to scuttle a revolving door policy that has seen top staff land jobs in the US state department and vice versa, and noting times when the group seems to put aside neutrality to side with the US. Keane Bhatt, the activist and writer behind the effort, will join us to talk about that.